"With Violets Wreathed and Robe of Saffron Hue," John W. Waterhouse, 1902, WikiArt photo.
“With Violets Wreathed and Robe of Saffron Hue,” John W. Waterhouse, 1902, WikiArt photo.

Surf between sea and sand, sandy isthmus
Binds mortal and divine, infinity of sight
And sound, universal desire for love and
Beauty, sacrifices made, tears and prayers
Heaven sent. O! Innocent fire, immortal
Glories realized through art, music, verse,
Creations to which heart and mind do cling.

How are these attained? Love of adoring
Face and eyes, rosy flesh amongst sky,
Thirst for watered-wine. Gentle cadence of
Sighs and moans, mortal frames trembling,
Entangled as tree and vine, both ascending
Cloud-bent from marveled shores, beyond
Grasp of earthly temples and tombs.

Life amongst flowered river streams, broad
Hearts into oceans flowing, by love engaged,
Fresh waters given to brine, beautiful and
Righteous, music and rhythm in waves, so
Subtle sophists say, intercourse, creativity,
Male and female, by childbirth, lovers,
Young and strong, embrace immortality.

"Gathering Almond Blossoms," John William Waterhouse, 1916, Wikimedia photo.
“Gathering Almond Blossoms,” John William Waterhouse, 1916, Wikimedia photo.

By new-found life, we are together bound,
Verses of adoration, colours simple and pure,
Tenor of your voice, fair echoes repeating,
Grace of deific deeds, we love upon altar of
Palate and pen, such a life as this, yet more
Passions known, for I have been awakened
And undone by your single touch.

This poem is written in spirit of Plato’s “The Banquet,”
an extended dialogue about the arts, divine, and
earthly love, the desire for immortality in midst
of human mortality, thus my attempt to condense
~50 pages of Plato into four stanzas. 

 

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