“Ingolf” by P. Raadsig, 1850, Viðeyjarstofa in Viðey, Reykjavik.
Wikipedia.

Blade fire-forged, edge turned on grinding
Wheel, Arnbjorn, Norse metalsmith offered
Songs of strength, lip-streams he recited,
Rhythm of muscle-wielded hammer strokes.
“Give me name, give me spirit,” he said to
Molten steel, “Blessings of Odin, King of
Skalds, battle-lives to slay.” Leafed-shaped
Steel, sunlight gleaming, grip-tang fitted,
Sheath of leather and gold, name self-
Realized, BrimSweord, fit for female hands,
Voices calling, beckoning from depths of
Norse forests to Greenland summer-tides
For new mistress, unsuspecting, longboat
Sailing, Brithe steady at steer-board.

Lo! Winds on whale-paths shifted, ice flowed
South at steady pace, wind in rigging calling,
“Brithe, BrimSweord beckons from afar, return
To family homesteads, seashore meeting on
Faroe Isles. As if arm and blade were lovers
Entwined, Arnbjorn, stout metal-master,
Understood this call, “To distant Sheep Isles
We must fly, storm petrels guide my course.”
Wood, stretched sails and woven ropes, two
Norse longboats plowed streaked foam,
Sword-fated destinies. Alas! North Seas cast
Witch-storm might, Brithe and Arnbjorn fought
Waves cold-crashing, tempests howling-
Descending over crests ship-breaching.

“Ingeborg,” Peter Nicolai Arbo, 1868, Wikimedia.

“Lest you die, turn back,” specters warned
Aloft, sirens would forcing ungreeting of
Brithe and Arnbjorn. Faith in gods and ship,
Sea-mettle tested soaking days and nights,
Crews sailed in wind-blown spray, Arnbjorn,
Metal-master, first landed on mist-swept
Faroe Isles, beacon fires burning, shore-
Guiding Brithe’s crew. Alas! Arnbjorn and
Brithe hand-clasped, knelt for sword-union
prayers, BrimSweord  found rightful mistress,
Hilt-to-hand embraced. Such were sagas told
Round blazing mead-hall fires, swilling ale,
Leg-meat roasting, Brithe and her Sea-Sword.

Written in the spirit of Icelandic Sagas, they have their own cadence and rhythm
not easily emulated in story, kenning usage, and in verse. 
For more on Viking
sword-making, see this link:

http://www.hurstwic.org/history/articles/manufacturing/text/viking_sword.htm

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