IV. Isle of Kos – Destruction of Tablets

"A Kiss," Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1891, WikiArt photo. For this poem, Athena with Thyonē kissing her first daughter, Kyra.
“A Kiss,” Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1891, WikiArt photo. For this poem, Athena with Thyonē kissing her first daughter, Kyra.

Following Athena’s guidance, Thyonē and Kryillos
Lived in happiness and wealth, a sea merchant with
Ships on the crescent Isle of Kos. They raised four
Lovely daughters, images of divine, demi-gods of
Athena, each a Platonic cardinal virtue: Temperance,
Prudence, Courage, and Justice, requirements of
Virtuous Greek life.

During peace and prosperity, Greek gods reigned
Supreme, messages of Holy Tablets diminished of
Importance than when first studied. Upon instruction
Of Athena, Kryillos and Thyonē carried the clay tablets
Upon the Ægean Sea, where they sent them to darkest
Depths, time and saltwater eroding sacred messages
And prophesies they contained.

"A Coign of Vantage," Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1895, WikiArt Photo. Three of four Thyonē's daughters, with Althea kneeling.
“A Coign of Vantage,” Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1895, WikiArt Photo. Three of four Thyonē’s daughters, with Althea kneeling.

In time, the four daughters were educated with divine
Families of their own, each having children, beloved
Of Kryillos and Thyonē. On a telling day, Kryillos
Visited his grandchildren on ocean shores. With
Each one he time spent, loving moments on his knee.
Taking rest upon sun-warmed rocks, Athena, true to
Her word, took Kryillos’ life lovingly into her arms.

As time progressed, Thyonē also died, favored of the
Gods, they lifted her up amongst the planets, to dwell
With Zeus, a moon orbiting and quaked by Jupiter’s
August magnetic force. Thus is legend of my mortal
Parents, tender and miraculous was their love, to live
Amongst them on Kos – and to dwell in columned
Temples with my mother, Athena, goddess divine.

Words dutifully written on parchment by their
grey-eyed daughter, Althea.

“Time crumbles things; everything grows old under the power of Time and is forgotten through the lapse of Time.” ― Aristotle

Thus concludes the final poem of this four-part series of Kryillos and his beloved, Thyonē.

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