III. Hidden Tablet – Secrets Revealed

"Temple of Athena Nike," Werner Carl-Freidrich, watercolour, 1877, Wikimedia photo.
“Temple of Athena Nike,” Werner Carl-Freidrich, watercolour, 1877, Wikimedia photo.

With Athenian battles far afield, Kryillos unearthed
Another tablet at the mountain earthquake site.
Covered in truth-concealing mud, its writings
Disclosed that a monotheistic god would replace
Hierarchy of Greek deities, knowledge he withheld
From Athena, though she knew Kryillos protected
Her from eventual toppling of her columned temples.

While deciphering mystic texts, Kryillos met Thyonē,
Maiden of Argos, bearer of spring water, medicinal
oils. A shy soul who wore modesty as her crown,
Thyonē relished ancient music and cathartic plays.
During their romance, Kryillos sensed Athena’s
Presence, or on starlit nights, the goddess, through
Thyonē, was intimately loving making in his arms.

"Among the Ruins," Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1902, WikiArt photo. For this poem, Thyonē picking flowers on Ægean shores.
“Among the Ruins,” Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1902, WikiArt photo. For this poem, Thyonē picking flowers on Ægean shores.

“I feel your presence in her,” Kryillos stated to
Athena, a vaporous light at her temple. “And I feel
Your presence in her,” replied Athena, not denying
His suspicions. “She carries your first child, a daughter,
Kyra, an immortal to live amongst the people, my gift
To you and to god-father, so that we may persevere by
Emerging demi-gods if by fates we are replaced.”

Accepting Athena’s love for Kryillos, Thyonē received
Gift of dream-visions. “Gods quaked an agéd temple
With a thunderbolt to hide the Holy Tablets,” Thyonē
Stated to Kryillos.* “They are not accepting of one god,
Just as we prefer many, their statues in our household
Temples, deities we can see, to make sacrifices, animal
And sacred plants, in dedication and in love.”

“Love resistless in fight, all yield at a glance of thine eye, love who pillowed all night on a maiden’s cheek dost lie, over the upland holds. Shall mortals not yield to thee?”
― Sophocles, “Antigone.”

*According to Pausanias, Greek pedestrian writer-geographer.

The next and  final poem of this series is “IV. Isle of Kos – Destruction of Tablets.”

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